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EuCham - European Chamber - 2014-09 Unequal Income Distribution

     


     
     
     



2014-09 Unequal Income Distribution

This chart of unequal income distributions was prepared using the Gini coefficient. The Gini coefficient (also known as the Gini index or Gini ratio) is a measure of statistical dispersion intended to represent the income distribution of a nation's residents. In theory, expressed as a percentage, it varies from 0 to 100: 0 indicating perfect equality (where everyone has the same income) and 100 indicating complete inequality (where one person receives the total income) in the country's population.

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EuCham Charts
September 2014

Unequal income distributions in Europe


1

Latvia

35.7

2

Spain

35.0

3

Portugal

34.5

4

Greece

34.3

5

Bulgaria

33.6

...

   

30

Slovenia

23.7

31

Norway

22.6


Gini coefficient of equivalised disposable income on a scale of 0 to 100, indicating perfect equality to inequality.
31 European countries were considered
 

EuCham_Charts_Logo.jpg

 

  • Latvia has the most unequal income distributions among 31 European countries
  • The chart continues with 3 Mediterranean countries: Spain, Portugal and Greece

  • Slovenia and Norway are ranked #30 and #31, indicating a relatively equal income distribution

 

Source: eucham.eu/charts 


Detailed Information

This chart of unequal income distributions was prepared using the Gini coefficient. The Gini coefficient (also known as the Gini index or Gini ratio) is a measure of statistical dispersion intended to represent the income distribution of a nation's residents. In theory, expressed as a percentage, it varies from 0 to 100: 0 indicating perfect equality (where everyone has the same income) and 100 indicating complete inequality (where one person receives the total income) in the country's population.

However, in practice the value range is tighter. In the CIA World Factbook, the values vary from 23 (Sweden, Scandinavia, 2005) to 63.2 (Lesotho, South of Africa, 1995), far greater than the highest value in Europe. Besides the Scandinavian countries such as Norway and Sweden, some Central and Eastern European countries in particular Slovenia, Czech Republic and Slovakia are also ranked as having relatively equal income distribution in the ranking below.

Table 1: Gini coefficient of equivalised disposable income of 31 European countries, 2013 data

Rank

Country

 Gini coefficient

1

Latvia

35.7

2

Spain

35.0

3

Portugal

34.5

4

Greece

34.3

5

Bulgaria

33.6

6

Romania

33.2

7

United Kingdom

32.8

8

Estonia

32.5

9

Lithuania

32.0

10

Italy

31.9

11

Cyprus

31.0

12

Poland

30.9

13

France

30.5

14

Croatia

30.5

15

Ireland

29.9

16

Switzerland

28.8

17

Germany

28.3

18

Denmark

28.1

19

Luxembourg

28.0

20

Austria

27.6

21

Malta

27.1

22

Hungary

26.9

23

Belgium

26.6

24

Finland

25.9

25

Netherlands

25.4

26

Slovakia

25.3

27

Czech Republic

24.9

28

Sweden

24.8

29

Iceland

24.0

30

Slovenia

23.7

31

Norway

22.6

Source: SILC (2013) at epp.eurostat.ec.europa.eu
EuCham Research Department - Compiled by Valeria Varga, reviewed by Kenneth Vekima

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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