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EuCham - European Chamber - Charts

     


     
     
     



Introduction

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The EuCham Research Department releases new charts periodically, with rankings of European countries based on various socio-economic criteria. EuCham statistically analyzes and summarizes business and society-related data from a combination of reliable primary sources about the whole European continent (usually covering up to 48 countries). Based on these solid primary sources, EuCham Charts should be your first choice for thought-provoking statistical data.

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EuCham Research Department
Silvia Farroni - This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Cansu Yılmaz - This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Supported by Jesse Karanja
Former associates: Léo Ronco, Anh Nguyen, Serena Scorza, Phan Thuy, Céline Lair

Best European countries for business 2017

EuCham ranks the European countries with the best economic environment out of the 46 nations considered in the analysis. The final scores result from the average between the DTF score of Doıng Busıness report (World Bank) and  the Corruption Perception Index score (Transparency International), since business integrity and transparency play an important role. In particular, the higher the average between these two values, the more favourable the country's environment is.

Based on this study, Nordic countries rank at the top of the list and can be identified as the nations in which it is best to do business with. Given the variables taken into consideration, it is clear that the EuCham score addresses the overall integrity and ethical issue of doing business together with its natural financial objective, also reflecting its long-term sustainability goals.

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2016-07 Best European countries for business 2016

EuCham - European Chamber lists the European countries which appear to have the best economic environment out of the 46 nations considered in the analysis. The final scores result from the average between the DTF (Distance to Frontier) index of World Bank and the CPI (Corruption Perception Index) of Transparency International, since business integrity and transparency play an important role. In particular, the higher the average between these two values, the more favourable the country's environment is.

Based on this study, Nordic countries rank at the top of the list and can be identified as the nations in which it is best to do business in. Given the variables taken into consideration, it is clear that EuCham score addresses the overall integrity and ethical issue of doing business together with its natural financial objective, also reflecting its long-term sustainability goals.

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Read more: 2016-07 Best European countries for business 2016

2015-11 Trade Openness Index

EuCham - European Chamber lists the Trade Openness Index of 43 countries identifying the economic performance of each country related to international trade. By taking the sum of import and export divided by the total GDP, the Index shows the percentage of trade compare with GDP and the differences between countries varying from 43 to 180.

Small economies are usually more dependent on trade than large economies. In general, export exceeds import in many of the countries, which means they are not only able to provide the domestic demand, but foreign markets as well. Trade has an impact on total GDP of the country as it encourages the development and the exchange of goods and services between a country and its international partners. Total GDP is affected by consumer, government and investment spending, importing and exporting.

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2015-10 Youth unemployment rates in Europe

EuCham - European Chamber lists European countries according to their youth unemployment rates in 2014. In general, youth unemployment has risen over the past decades and is much higher than unemployment among older people in the society (OECD, 2009). The difference between youth unemployment and total unemployment rates is analysed as well as the causes and results of high youth unemployment.

Youth unemployment rates have risen over the past decades and often exceeds the unemployment rates of the older people in the society. Nordic countries have the lowest unemployment rates within Europe which is a result of their strong transition system from education to employment. Europe can be divided in three parts in terms of youth unemployment rates; low rates in Northern countries, high rates in Southern / Mediterranean countries and the rest ranking in the middle.

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2015-09 Female employment rates and causality analysis of economic growth

EuCham - European Chamber lists the female employment rates and analyzes the causal relationship between female employment and economic growth using a panel data of 32 countries in the period 2006-2014. The result of the econometric analysis shows that bidirectional or unidirectional causalities exist between female employment and economic growth. This means that female employment levels affect economic growth, and vice versa.

Statistics show that the three highest female employment rates in 2014 were in Iceland, Sweden and Switzerland with 80.5%, 77.6% and 77.4% respectively. Turkey lagged far behind Greece and was at the bottom of the list with 31.6%.

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2015-08 Unemployment based on education level

EuCham aims to find the relation between the increasing difference in unemployment level in basic and in advance education. For the sake of better understanding the data, in this study low-skill and high skill intensive sectors will refer to the sectors which mostly employ people with basic education and with advanced education, respectively.

Many economic models suggested that the unemployment gap between low and high skill intensive sectors would decrease over the 21st century. However, acquired data proves expectations wrong.

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2015-07 Government debt as a percentage of GDP

Government debt or ‘public debt’ is defined as the total amount of money owed by the government to creditors. After the financial crisis, which began in the late 2007, European countries highly increased their percentage of government debt.

Currently, Greece has the highest government debt to GDP ratio of 174%, which led the country to debt crisis and a possibility of default. In a five year period, the country has been lent an astonishing amount of money in not just one but two bailouts, resulting in $275 billion, worth more than the country’s entire economic output. Following Greece are Italy (2nd), Cyprus (3rd) and Belgium (4th) whose high public debt may reduce their long-run growth and may partly negate the positive effects of the fiscal stimulus.

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2015-06 Business and Labor Freedom

EuCham lists the European countries according to their Business and Labor Freedom, in order to identify the countries with the least restrictive environments to conduct a business.

Denmark tops the general ranking, achieving a score of 94.8 out of 100, and remains one of the European most efficient and transparent regulatory environments. Georgia (2nd) catches up the United Kingdom (3rd) and they are now rubbing shoulders. Flexible and modern employment regulations sustain their labor markets, as their competitive and efficient regulatory framework definitely facilitates entrepreneurial activities.

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2015-05 Digital Development Index

The European Chamber ranked the European countries according to their Digital Development, in order to highlight the countries with the most favorable environment to start a business in IT related fields.

Finland is leading the transition toward digitization by virtue of the wide availability of digital technologies and contents, which boost the developing of new products, services and organizational models. With Sweden (2nd), Norway (6th) and Denmark (in the 7th place), the Scandinavian region can be considered the main hub for digital businesses. Switzerland, backed by a high-skilled workforce, and Netherlands, entirely provided with internet access, hold the third and fourth positions.

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2015-04 Competitiveness Improvement in Europe

EuCham - European Chamber lists the countries based on the Global Competitiveness Index (GCI) improvement from the global financial crisis in 2008 to nowadays. GCI is defined by the World Economic Forum as the set of institutions, policies, and factors that determine the level of productivity (hence competitiveness and growth potential) of a country. While Switzerland, Germany and Scandinavian countries are dominant in Europe concerning competitiveness, the main aim of the chart is to highlight the countries which experienced the biggest variations, including Macedonia, Georgia, and Bulgaria, in the overall score since 2008, in order to quantify the result of their effort to overcome the aftermath of crisis.

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